Google aspires to own formats for HDR video and 3D audio – ICT news


Google is reportedly considering introducing its own royalty-free media formats for HDR video and 3D audio to compete with Dolby’s better-known formats.

These would be new formats for HDR video and 3D audio, according to technology site Protocol, and direct competitors to Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos. Dolby Vision is a quality format for HDR video found, for example, in high-end 4K televisions. Dolby Atmos, on the other hand, is better known and guarantees, among other things, a richer sound in speakers and soundbars.

Protocol says he watched a presentation of ‘Project Caviar’, which includes ‘two new media formats for HDR video and 3D audio under a new consumer brand’. The point here is that it’s a royalty-free alternative to Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision, so hardware manufacturers that use Google’s formats should no longer pay Dolby royalties. .

YouTube and Android

According to Google, this should lead to a ‘healthier and broader ecosystem’, but of course it’s also about money. With its new formats, Google intends to create better possibilities for reproducing 3D sound and HDR video, such as Dolby Atmos and Vision, but in this case without Dolby. With a neutral codec, hardware manufacturers, but also Google, could produce devices that offer richer audio and video experiences without having to pay royalties. This would also be important for YouTube, for example, which supports HDR10+, but not more sophisticated versions such as Dolby Vision. The popular video site also does not support 3D audio. If more streaming services supported Google’s new standard, the result would be that Android devices could also support better sound.

More economical

Dolby is a particularly popular standard, and the company has collaboration agreements with a whole host of hardware manufacturers, like TVs, speakers, and more. One of them is Apple, Google’s main competitor, which is collaborating with Dolby on the Spatial Audio standard. We also notice this with iPhones, which accept Dolby Atmos sound formats, for example, unlike most Android devices.

To compete, Google needed to make its formats royalty-free or, at the very least, more cost-effective than Dolby’s. According to FlatpanelsHD, for example, hardware manufacturers must pay up to three dollars per TV to embed Dolby Vision support. Everything seems to indicate that the technological giant wants to realize if the hardware manufacturers are ready to change their tune to adopt a more economical version.

These would be new formats for HDR video and 3D audio, according to technology site Protocol, and direct competitors to Dolby Vision and Dolby Atmos. Dolby Vision is a quality format for HDR video found, for example, in high-end 4K televisions. Dolby Atmos, on the other hand, is better known and guarantees, among other things, a richer sound in speakers and soundbars. HDR and 3D audio under a new consumer brand’. The point here is that it’s a royalty-free alternative to Dolby Atmos and Dolby Vision, so hardware manufacturers that use Google’s formats should no longer pay Dolby royalties. According to Google, this should lead to a ‘healthier and broader ecosystem’, but of course it’s also about the money. With its new formats, Google intends to create better possibilities for reproducing 3D sound and HDR video, such as Dolby Atmos and Vision, but in this case without Dolby. With a neutral codec, hardware manufacturers, but also Google, could produce devices that offer richer audio and video experiences without having to pay royalties. This would also be important for YouTube, for example, which supports HDR10+, but not more sophisticated versions such as Dolby Vision. The popular video site also does not support 3D audio. If more streaming services supported Google’s new standard, the result would be that Android devices could also support better sound. Dolby is a particularly popular standard, and the company has collaboration agreements with a range of manufacturers hardware, such as televisions, speakers, etc. One of them is Apple, Google’s main competitor, which is collaborating with Dolby on the Spatial Audio standard. We also notice this with iPhones, which accept Dolby Atmos sound formats, for example, unlike most Android devices. To compete, Google had to make its formats free of rights or, at the very least, more economical than those of Dolby. According to FlatpanelsHD, for example, hardware manufacturers must pay up to three dollars per TV to embed Dolby Vision support. Everything seems to indicate that the technological giant wants to realize if the hardware manufacturers are ready to change their tune to adopt a more economical version.

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